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Close up view of a plate of round halloween cookies, frosted with orange, lime green, purple, and black individually. Each has a white stylized spider web design in the coloured background.
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5 from 1 vote

Halloween Spider Web Cookies

Using just two colours of icing, you can quickly and easily make these fun Spider Web Sugar Cookie, for your Halloween Treats spread!
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Resting time6 hrs
Total Time6 hrs 35 mins
Course: Dessert, Snack
Author: Marie Porter
Cost: $10

Equipment

Rolling Pin
Round Cookie Cutters
Frosting Bags
Cake Decorating Set (Optional)
Gel Food Colouring
Toothpicks

Ingredients

Instructions

Roll and bake your cookies.

  • Following your recipe directions - especially with regard to chilling! - roll and cut out your cookies - I like doing 3-4" diameter rounds for this.
  • Take care to ensure the cookies are of VERY even thickness, for the best results. I like to use a rolling pin with thickness guides to help with that.
  • Once the cookies are out of the oven, you can place a piece of parchment over top of the hot cookies and gently press another cookie sheet down - lightly - to flatten any distortion that may have happened during baking. This is optional, but gives a very flat surface to decorate.
  • Allow cookies to cool to room temperature.
    Stack of round, un-decorated cookies

Prepare Your Icing

  • Prepare your royal icing, following the directions in your chosen recipe.
  • Take out about ⅕-1/4 of your royal icing. This will be your white, for the spider webs.
  • Tint your remaining royal icing. You can do it all the same colour, or divide it into little bowls to tint different colours. I like to do a mix of orange, green, purple, and black,
  • Check the consistency of your icing AFTER tinting. When you use a spoon to pick some of the frosting up and drop it back down into the bowl, you’ll want it to smooth out in between 5-10 seconds. (I like to keep it about 6-7 seconds)
  • If your icing smooths out and disappears in less than 5 seconds, it’s too runny. Stir a little more powdered sugar in, until it is in the 5-10 second range.
  • If your dropped icing takes more than 10 seconds to disappear back into the rest of it, it’s too thick. Add a little water - a few drops at a time - and stir well. Re test, and adjust more as needed.
  • Once your icing is all the proper consistency, transfer it to frosting bags.
  • For me, I’ll put the colours into bags just as-is. You can use a coupler and round tip if you’d like, I don’t find it worth the hassle. Squeeze any air pockets out the back end, tie off the bag close to the frosting, and do not cut the tip off til you’re ready to use it.
  • For the white frosting, I’ll set the frosting bag up with a coupler inside, trim the end, and affix a smallish round tip - usually about a #3. You want it small enough to be relatively dainty, but wide enough that it leaves a thick enough pipe of white frosting to pull out well. Squeeze out air pockets and tie off the bag.
  • Cover any frosting not being used, it dries out quickly!

Decorate your cookies

  • If you’re doing multiple background colours, decide how many cookies you’ll do in each one, and divide them out. When you get in the groove, it’s easy to do more than you thought you were doing, and not have cookies left for the other colours!
  • Grab your first frosting bag, and cut the very end of the tip off. I like to cut enough off as to leave about a ¼" diameter opening.
  • Carefully pipe your outer circle, inside the outer edge of your first cookie. I like to leave a it of a border along the outside of the cookie top, as it gives a little room for dragging the icing outward.
    A hand in the foreground is applying orange frosting to a cookie
  • Once the outer edge is piped, quickly - but carefully - fill in the center of the cookie with frosting.
    You don’t have to pipe all of the frosting in, think of it more as “flooding” - you can use the frosting bag to sort of encourage frosting to spread, as you’d adding more,
    A single round cookie, with orange frosting covering the top.
  • Take your white frosting, and pipe a small circle / blob of frosting in the center.
  • Pipe concentric circles of white around the center circle. Note that these don’t have to be perfect, they’re going to get distorted in the next step.
    A single round cookie, with orange frosting covering the top. There are concentric circles of white frosting piped over the orange.
  • Once you have all of your circles piped, use a toothpick to draw the frosting out from the center blob.
    Place the point of one toothpick into the center blob of frosting, and just gently drag it though the icing, ending at the outer edge of icing.
    A hand is using a tooth pick to draw the frosting outward from the center of the cookie.
  • Wipe your toothpick off, and repeat.
    Sometimes I’ll just do lines one after another around the circle, sometimes I’ll do one, then go immediately across from it and pull the center out in the opposite direction.
    Do what feels right to you!
    A hand is using a tooth pick to draw the frosting outward from the center of the cookie.
  • Once all the lines are pulled out, set the cookie aside to dry, and repeat on your remaining cookies.
    A single cookie with orange and white frosting on top. The white frosting forms a stylized spider web design.

Wait!

  • Allow the cookies to dry for at least 6 hours, ideally overnight.
  • ... And you’re done! Take some pics of your work, and share it with us online!
    Close up view of a plate of round halloween cookies, frosted with orange, lime green, purple, and black individually. Each has a white stylized spider web design in the coloured background.